Fishing vessel transformed into a wave power plant (phys.org)
Is it possible for a redundant fishing vessel to be used as a power plant? Absolutely! The first vessel of its kind is now anchored offshore in the Stadthavet area west in Norway, with the aim of generating electricity from the natural forces of the sea.
For the last two years his company has been working with Geir Arne Solheim, the founder of Havkraft AS and the man who came up with the idea, to develop and build the wave power plant now installed in a former trawler/autoline vessel.
But how do you get a fishing vessel to work like a gigantic bicycle pump?
The makers have met this challenge by installing four large chambers in the vessel's bow. As the waves strike the vessel, the water level in the chambers rises. This creates an increase in air pressure which in turn drives four turbines – one for each chamber. The pitch of the vessel also contributes by generating additional air pressure in the chambers when the wave height is large. The design of the chambers is such that they work in response to different wave heights, which means that the energy is exploited very effectively.
"The plant thus produces electricity with the help of what is called a fluctuating water column", explains Kvernevik, who has spent much of his working life designing and building vessels. "All we have to do is to let the vessel swing at anchor in a part of the ocean with sufficient wave energy. Everything is designed to be remotely-controlled from onshore", he says.


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-02-fishing-vessel-power.html#jCp
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